Recent Reads

Sun Tzu Art of War for Managers

A must read for everyone in the industry. Most of the information is something that can be gained by experience but the book gives an indepth explanation of the strategies that might exist in one’s subconscious(as a result of one’s experiences). It helps to know why you should do the things the way you do. Hint: Take it slow. There is a lot of concentrated information.

The Monk who sold is Ferrari by Robin Sharma

The content is not poor but the the delivery of the content is poor making this book not worth reading. I completed the book in hopes that the later chapters would be interesting. That wasn’t true. The author could have done a much better job. Read “God’s Debris” and “The five people you meet in heaven” instead. The delivery style is similar but these books don’t let you leave.

Delivering Happiness by Tony Hsieh

This book starts like an autobiography and has lot of momentum at the start. It is this momentum that kept me going to the end. The last 50% of the book is about corporate culture and there is too much repetition of it. It’s a good book for a light read and I would recommend trying it, but, unlike some of the other books that I have read I don’t think I will re-read it.

Head Rush Ajax by Brett Mclaughlin
Good book for beginners on Ajax. If you are new to Ajax and want to know how things work (without frameworks), read this book. If you want to dive into code straightaway, start looking at frameworks like Prototype and JQuery instead of this book.

Head First Javascript by Michael Morrison
This is a beginners book. If you have any experience in programming and know some javascript, avoid this book. This book is good for new programmers who have no experience in Javascript.

The Paradigms of Programming by Floyd Robert

Rocket Surgery Made Easy: The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Finding and Fixing Usability Problems by Steve Krug
This was a huge disappointment. After dragging myself through 30 pages, I just skimmed the whole book in 15 mins. Steve has failed to follow what he preaches…keep things concise. I was expecting to see how I could use tools and ways to test usability; instead it is a book on how one could conduct usability tests. Rocket surgery without the rocket. I am sorry Steve, but this was better just as a chapter in your earlier book.

Don’t Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability by Steve Krug
Excellent book on Web Usablity. A definite read. Read more about this book on my blog.

SuperFreakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner
Ok. We get it. I did not like this as much as Freakonomics(see below). Same cake with a different icing. It is worth reading but don’t spent too much time on it. The authors could have done a much better job if the content was concise.

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner
Another book that deals with human behavior and economics. Well, more of economics I think, but, it covers some ground as Predictably Irrational. (It also has some references to Dan Ariely’s work). The thing I learnt from this book – data is the most important thing in any field.

Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions – by Dan Ariely
Dan has done an excellent job of explaining human behavior. I plan to read this again.

The Carrot Principle:How the Best Managers Use Recognition to Engage Their People, Retain Talent, and Accelerate Performance by Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton
A good book that talks of one idea… how to recognize employees. Read this over a weekend.

The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles by Steven Pressfield
A well written book that shows us the obvious and helps us understand that the first step to success is to overcome your inner fear of failure.

This was a huge disappointment. After dragging myself through 30 pages, I just skimmed the whole book in 15 mins. Steve has failed to follow what he preaches…keep things concise. I was expecting to see how I could use tools and ways to
Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: